Posts

How to E-Verify your company in 5 easy steps!

E-Verify

E-Verify is an Internet-based system that compares information from an employee’s Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, to data from U.S. Department of Homeland Security and Social Security Administration records to confirm employment eligibility. It is the only fast, accurate, and free service of its kind that verifies employees’ data against millions of government records.

 

Step 1: Visit enrollment website Enrollment website.

Step 2: Answer Access Method Questions There are four access methods, each providing different functions within E-Verify for your company.  The four access methods are: employer, E-Verify employer agent, corporate administrator, and Web services. E-Verify will guide you through four questions to help determine which access method is right for your company.

Step 3: Sign MOU (Memorandums of Understanding) Review the terms and conditions explained in the MOU.  Indicate whether you agree with the terms, which will be your electronic signature.  You will be given the opportunity to download a copy of your electronically signed MOU at the end of the enrollment process.  

Step 4: Enter company information Continue enrolling by entering your company information.  After entering in all the information, review to make sure it is correct,  certify your information, then submit to become E-Verified!

Step 5: Print MOU Once you have reached the Enrollment Confirmation page, E-Verify has received your enrollment information.  Be sure to print a signed copy of the MOU for your records.

Once verified, an employer can enter the information from an employee’s Form I-9 in E-Verify, which will then compare the information to records available to the US Department of Homeland Security.  If the information matches, the case will receive an Employment Authorized result almost immediately.  If the information does not match, the case will receive a Tentative Nonconfirmation result.

For more information click here.

10 Disastrous Resume Mistakes

Avoid these common errors to stand out and secure that job!

Everyone knows to include their name, contact information, and work experience on a resume. But what is going to make your resume stand out? What should you avoid to give you the best chance of being chosen for your dream position?

  1. Typos and grammatical errors. This is important for every job candidate to avoid, but for international students, it’s a good idea to add an extra step and have a native English speaker with good grammar skills review your resume for grammar and usage. It’s important for employers to be confident in your command of the English language.
  2. Using passive language. U.S. employers value self-motivation and action. The more your language reflects action, the better. This list of action verbs from The Muse will help make your resume stand out.
  3. Including illegal information. In the U.S. it is illegal for employers to ask certain questions. If this information is included on your resume, you will automatically be disqualified from applying. Illegal information includes:
    1. TOEFL Score
    2. A Photograph
    3. Immigration Status
    4. Age/Birth date
    5. Hometown/Home Country
    6. Marital Status
    7. Race/Ethnicity
    8. Religion
  4. Focusing on group accomplishments.  Group accomplishments are a great thing to include on your resume because they demonstrate your ability to work on a team. However, you should focus this description on your role within the team.
  5. Listing tasks instead of problems solved. “Responsible for updating social media accounts,” becomes “Increased social media engagement scores by 13% by implementing new strategy.”
  6. A Hard to read format. Hiring managers generally have a lot of applicants for one position and want to be able to scan your resume quickly at first. Instead of writing in paragraph format, use bullet points whenever possible. In addition, an easy-to-read open sans font is a must.
  7. A lack of imagination or creativity. Hiring managers get tired of reading “resume-speak.” They also get tired of looking at resumes generated from templates. The level of creativity should match the type of position you are seeking. A graphic artist, for example, may have some graphic elements included in their resume, while an engineer would be expected to have a more traditional resume.
  8. A lack of focus. If you’re applying for an IT Specialist position, the time you spent as an intern in the IT Department at the University, or serving as the technical consultant for your favorite student group is relevant. Working in the dish room of the cafeteria is not. Make sure you highlight the experience that is relevant.
  9. Not including keywords. Especially if you submit an application online, hiring managers will likely use software that searches by keyword to sift through the first round of resumes. If you do not have those keywords in your resume, it will not make the first cut. A good practice is to identify the likely keywords being searched by reading the job description carefully, and then making sure those keywords are in your resume.
  10. Not offering references. If this is your first job, list professors in your major area of study, academic advisers, research partners, or anyone else that can speak to your work ethic and knowledge of your area of study. If you have job experience, a supervisor or a co-worker in a position of authority is the best reference.

Download our handy Resume and Interview Guide for more tips!

And don’t forget to sign up for the GOregistry and keep your profile up to date so employers search for YOU!